DIY Halloween-Stamp Treat Bags – With Free Template!

Hand-Stamped Halloween Treat Bags – Free Template in the free trial for Stamp Camp, https://classes.kimwerker.com/courses/stamp-camp

Just in time for Halloween (or, you know, any kind of occasion that calls for some spooky fun), here's a super simple stamp project.

I carved some ghastly stamps and used them on small paper bags I'll fill with treats for my kid's friends for Halloween, but you could just as easily use them on cards, banners, posters, or any other kind of decoration.

Get the free halloween stamp template!

Hand-Stamped Halloween Treat Bags – Free Template in the free trial for Stamp Camp, https://classes.kimwerker.com/courses/stamp-camp

What You Need


Here's everything you need to make Halloween treat bags (obviously, sub out the bags for an appropriate printing surface if you're making cards or banners instead!)

Hand-Stamped Halloween Treat Bags – Free Template in the free trial for Stamp Camp, https://classes.kimwerker.com/courses/stamp-camp

Tips

  • Make sure you stamp the area of the bag that will be visible once the bag is full and the top is folded over.
  • Keep in mind that the folds and seams of the bag will affect how the stamp applies the ink. Embrace the tiny imperfections!
  • Not all light-coloured inks will show up well on dark paper – be sure to read ink labels carefully, and experiment.
  • These stamps are cute on their own, if I do say so myself, but I love them even more when I use them as a starting point. In the photo at the top of the post, you can see how much more awesome the bags look with a little bit of gel pen and marker thrown into the mix.
Hand-Stamped Halloween Treat Bags – Free Template in the free trial for Stamp Camp, https://classes.kimwerker.com/courses/stamp-camp

Get the free halloween stamp template!

Hand-Stamped Halloween Treat Bags – Free Template in the free trial for Stamp Camp, https://classes.kimwerker.com/courses/stamp-camp
Hand-Stamped Halloween Treat Bags – Free Template in the free trial for Stamp Camp, https://classes.kimwerker.com/courses/stamp-camp
Hand-Stamped Halloween Treat Bags – Free Template in the free trial for Stamp Camp, https://classes.kimwerker.com/courses/stamp-camp

What I’m Making: Veronika Cardigan

Work in progress: Veronika Cardigan – http://kimwerker.com/blog

At Knit City a couple of weeks ago, I tried on the Veronika Cardigan and immediately fell in love. I’m not usually keen to knit garments, but I was powerless against this one.

I knew I had enough yarn of one kind or another at home to make it, so I bought the pattern and dug out my Rubbermaid. In it, I found this gorgeous navy yarn I bought a million years ago – maybe at my very first Rhinebeck?

It was intended to become a sweater for my husband, but I didn’t buy enough yardage and the yarn has been sitting in this bin for over a decade. To be honest, as the yarn is unlabeled it’s entirely possible I don’t have enough to make this sweater, either. But I’ll cross that bridge when I come to it.

The yarn is perfect for Veronika. The stitches are flying off my needles, and this project has been my constant companion, in addition to my kid, as the Yankees have progressed in post-season baseball.

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/veronika-cardigan

What I’m Making: A Kid’s Pillow from Old Pajamas

Upcycled pillow out of outgrown pajamas. So fun! – http://kimwerker.com/blog

My kid had a big growth spurt this past summer, and by the end of it, most of his pajama pants fit him more like capris. (Or, as we like to call capris in our family: shpants.)

As we went through his outgrown pajamas and made a pile to donate, he grabbed one pair of pants and announced he loved them so much he didn’t want to give them away – he wanted to make a pillow out of them.

(At some point when he was a toddler, we made a pillow out of a shirt. I don’t remember the project, and I don’t think we even have it anymore, but it’s stuck in his head that we make pillows out of old clothes we love, and I love this idea so, so much.) (Also, I have a growing pile of his old clothes I want to make a quilt out of someday.)

So here’s what we did:

First, Cut Off a Leg

Since these pants were made from a stretchy knit fabric, I held them taught while my son wielded my fabric scissors. We cut the leg off as near to the crotch of the pants as possible, to make for the longest/biggest pillow. We also cut the elastic off the cuff, at the ankle.

(I took this photo later on in the process [scroll down for notes on adding an appliqué], but below you can see one of the cut-up ends of the pant leg.)

How to make a pillow from old pajama pants – http://kimwerker.com/blog

Next, Sew Up One End

We could have simply sewed the ankle end shut, but it was way more fun for the kid to decide on a design for felt scales to sew in there, too. So he took a sharpie to some felt, then he got frustrated trying to cut felt with safety scissors and my fabric scissors were too big for him to use for detail cutting. So I cut out the design.

Then I sandwiched the felt inside the ankle end of the pants leg, threaded some embroidery floss onto a sharp embroidery needle, and taught the kid how to sew a running stitch through the three layers of fabric.

You might think a running stitch – and not a terribly tightly sewn one – wouldn’t be appropriate for eventually keeping stuffing from coming out of the pillow, but (spoiler) it’s worked great.

Felt scales at the end of a pillow upcycled from pajama pants – http://kimwerker.com/blog

Maybe, If You Want, Make an Appliqué

The kid didn’t particularly want to make this pillow into a monster, but when I suggested he could cut out a shape of felt and decorate it however he wanted, he decided that would be a grand thing to do. He drew a big triangle, I helped him cut it out (mental note to get him scissors that are sharp enough for cutting felt or fabric), then he took a Sharpie to it.

At this point, he’d lost interest in the slow part of hand-sewing, and he expressed zero desire to sew the appliqué on. No big. I sewed it on, for I love the slow part of hand-sewing. While I did this, he went outside and tossed a baseball against a net.

Applique on upcycled pillow from outgrown pajama pants – http://kimwerker.com/blog

Now Stuff It

We used basic poly-fil as stuffing. You could, alternatively, use scrap fabric or yarn, or a mixture of scraps and poly-fil, for a more eco-friendly (though lumpier) stuffing. (I love eco-friendly lumpy stuffings, FWIW.)

Use as much or as little stuffing as you or your small friend wants.

Finally, Sew Up the Other End

We again cut out some felt humps to sew into the second and final seam at the crotch end of the pant leg.

Because of the stuffing, I used pins to keep things together, with the humps sandwiched between the halves of pant leg as for the ankle end.

The kid did the sewing after I got it started, and I held things together for him as he went, obviously removing pins as he progressed.

And there you have it: a pillow made out of old, outgrown pajama pants!

The kid’s slept with it in his bed every night since we made it.

What do you do with outgrown-but-beloved clothes?

PS You can see bits of a book in some of these photos. It’s a great book called Sewing School: 21 Sewing Projects Kids Will Love to Make, by Andria Lisle and Amie Petronis Plumley. We didn’t follow instructions from the book to make the pillow, but even starting from a place of the kid flipping through and saying he didn’t like any of the projects for pillows was a great launching point for figuring out what he did want to make. And the book assured me running stitch was a totally age-appropriate skill to teach him. Also, I love this book because the projects are made by actual kids – there is zero room for comparing what you or your kid makes against any sort of “perfection”. It’s all gloriously age-appropriate. And therefore absolutely what it should be!

Make a DIY upcycled pillow out of old or outgrown pajamas. So fun! – http://kimwerker.com/blog

What I’m Making: A Very Short Woven Scarf

Weaving quote, by Joan Erikson. – http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

It was more than a couple of years ago that a friend announced on Facebook that they were looking to sell their barely used 10″ Cricket Loom. As it was my birthday, I decided this was exactly the right thing to buy myself.

My kid helped me warp the loom with an odd ball of variegated yarn, and I chose a second odd ball of black tweed yarn for the weft.

Weaving goes fast! Way faster than knitting or crocheting.

But then something got in the way of me finishing the project. A mental block. Maybe I wished I’d chosen a yarn I had more of, so I could actually finish a scarf-length project (even with the uneven edges that come with any first weaving project)? Maybe I was concerned the finishing steps would be tedious or complicated?

I have no idea. What I do know is that this project stayed on the loom for years after I finished weaving it.

Until now. I finally got the thing off my loom! It took a sum total of about fifteen minutes and the aid of Liz Gipson’s fabulous book. That’s it!

So now that I’ve gotten over the anxieties of my very first project, I’m ready to take on a more deliberate one. Surely for a scarf again. But which yarns will I use?

Stay tuned.

My first rigid headle weaving! More at http://kimwerker.com/blog

What I’m Making: Kid-Size Messenger Bags

Kid-size messenger bags for adventuring! http://kimwerker.com/blog

When we were planning our summer camping trip with friends – a two-week road trip with two pretty-much-seven-year-olds – we got it in our heads that it would be fun to give the kids merit badges as they accomplish cool stuff over the course of the trip.

Which sparked the question of what the kids would do with their merit badges. Um, also I ordered a lot of them.

Their school backpacks have too many pockets and zippers to make them a good canvas for sewing badges onto, and anyway we suspect that once it’s time to go back to school they might not want their school bag to be covered in badges for things like playing frisbee golf or cooking with pie irons.

The obvious solution was to make them messenger bags for the trip. The flap would be the perfect canvas for sewing badges onto, and the bag would be great for beach-combing and finding all kinds of other treasures while we explore the world.

I’m not exactly an expert bag sewer, and my friend hadn’t sewn since she was in school, but we decided to go for it.

I picked up some olive-coloured cotton canvas fabric for the outside of the bag, and lightweight quilting cotton for the pockets and linings. My kid is bananas for baseball and my friend’s is similarly in love with soccer, so there you go.

We followed these instructions, with the following modifications:

  • Downsized the bag to make it more appropriate for young kids:
    • Finished size 9″w x 11″h x 3″d (it looks quite a bit narrower because the depth of the bag)
      • Body and lining cut to 11″ x 23″ (sized for 1/2″ seam allowances instead of 1/4″)
      • Flap and lining cut to 9″ x 12.5″
  • No applique or other decoration on the flaps
  • Slightly rounded flap corners for my kid’s bag (baseball); pointed corners for my friend’s kid’s (soccer)
  • No inside pockets
  • Outside pocket under the flap rather than on the back side of the bag that rests against your body when you wear it (this was as much due to not understanding from the instructions that the pocket wasn’t actually intended to go under the flap in the first place)
  • Made an adjustable strap using these instructions instead of making the one-size strap in the bag instructions

This project took us way longer than we thought it would, but in the process she remembered how to use a sewing machine and I remembered why I don’t make more bags. In the end, though, we’re really happy with how they came out, and we hope the kids take to them, too.

Kid-size messenger bags for adventuring! http://kimwerker.com/blog