What I’m Making: A Knitted Hat in Handspun Yarn

Hat knitted from handspun yarn! http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

This is the second project I made from this batch of handspun – the first handspun I’ve ever felt was ready to actually be made into something. (The other hat is the same, but smaller to fit my six-year-old.)

Hooray!

It’s a basic 80-stitch hat with a ribbed brim, and I used 4.5mm and 5.0mm needles to make it.

I’ll take it on our camping trip next month, so no need to wait till it gets cold this fall to wear it!

What’s your favourite thing to make with handspun yarn?

Pegboard DIY (and a Class in Production!)

My next online class is in production, and I needed to film it against a background that was, well, that was not the lumpy 100-year-old wall of my tiny studio.

Pegboard to the rescue! Though it started out white, I wanted to give it a good coat of paint. So I lightly sanded the white surface, and dug up a leftover can of ceiling paint. Ceiling paint is great for filming against, because it’s about as matte as matte paint gets. Plus, it covers great and dries quickly!

Two coats later and it was ready to go.

Super quick pegboard DIY – http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

Can you guess the topic of class? It’s on carving stamps for the very first time!

If you’ve wanted to learn how to make your own stamps – of anything at all, that you can use over and over again in all kinds of projects – and you want to learn and play in your own space at your own pace, sign up to be the first to hear when the class launches!

YES! TELL ME AS SOON AS THE STAMP CLASS IS READY!

Onward!

What I’m Making: Glass Beads for the First Time

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

When my friend Lisa asked if I’d take a day-long bead-making workshop with her at the Terminal City Glass Co-op, I signed up without even reading the description of what we’d learn. I’ll sign up to try pretty much anything that requires protective gear, really.

I realized early on in the class that I’m going to have a complicated relationship with bead-making, because I’m not generally big on shiny things. Those beads in the photo above are samples our instructor had on hand. They’re amazing, hey?

Only thing is, I wouldn’t want them. You know? The complicated part, of course, is that making them is amazing. Which I discovered over the course of the day.

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

As anticipated, there was danger and intrigue, and protective eyewear.

(Yes, I was the one student in the class to burn herself. Go me!)

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

The setup was pretty awesome. Each student had a workstation around a huge metal table that sat under the biggest range hood I’ve ever seen.

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

Those colourful rods are glass. That’s what we melted to make beads. For real, it was incredible. And chemical!

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

Believe it or not, the burn did not happen while I was taking this photo with my left hand while I held glass to a blowtorch with my right.

That’s one of the first two beads I made. We all started working with black glass because, though you don’t see it here, it turns a very conspicuous red colour when it’s hot. Super easy to see what’s going on.

The metal rod that’s holding the bead is called a mandrel. Same idea as the thicker rods ring-makers use. The end is coated in dried clay slip, which, when washed away, leaves just enough wiggle room for the bead to come off the rod.

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

In addition to beads, we learned how to make thinner/finer rods of glass we can use to do detailed colourwork (like adding dots, etc.). We learned how to twist two colours together, too. I didn’t manage to do it right this time. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

The beads needed to cure in a kiln for eight hours after the class ended, so I went back to the Co-op a couple of days later to pick up my beads.

First I had to soak the mandrels to loosen the slip enough that I could wash it away. Then I wiggled the beads loose, washed more slip away, and liberated those suckers from their metal prisons.

After that, I used a diamond-crusted tool to file more clay away from inside the bead holes.

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

Et voila! It’s almost impossible to think that this is the entirety of what I made during a seven-hour class. But I learned so much. Lisa and I will go back to the Co-op for sure (she already has, actually). This is not something I plan to ever do at home (OMG the safety precautions), and I’m so glad there’s a place where I can drop in on one of their two weekly Newbie Nights to see if I can’t make it to the point that I produce something even and lovely.

Have you ever made anything from glass? What do you do with what you make? Share links in the comments!

PS After the workshop, before I collapsed from exhaustion, I told the kid that I’d tried to make a heart-shaped bead, just for him, but that it came out looking more like a wonky apple. Still, when I showed him the beads, he claimed that one for himself. ❤️

Making glass beads for the first time! More at http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

 

What I Learned Sewing with Knits for the First Time

What I Learned Sewing Knits for the First Time Using My Regular Sewing Machine – http://kimwerker.com/blog

Last weekend I had the house all to myself for two days, and I decided it was finally time to try sewing with knit fabric on my regular sewing machine. I’d read that it can be done. I’d bought some fabric on sale over months and months. I’d bookmarked a class on CreativeBug, and had even, ages ago, printed out the pattern for the Wanderlust Tee.

To be clear, I have only ever sewn two garments in my life: a robe for my son a few years ago, and a very wee pair of baby pants. I’m no garment-sewing expert is what I’m saying.

And though I’ve had fabric and a pattern for a simple shirt for years, I eventually realized that what I wear are t-shirts. Every day I wear one! Which is why I never got around to making clothes for myself out of woven fabrics. High time to just see if I could make a t-shirt, then.

Here, I’ll skip right to the end: I made myself three shirts over the weekend. And most of a fourth!

What I Learned Sewing Knits for the First Time – http://www.kimwerker.com/blog

I was not speedy. At times, it was very slow-going and very tedious. But with each successive shirt, I worked a bit faster. With each successive shirt, I became more confident that I will make more (many, many more).

Now. Usually knit fabrics are sewn with a serger, which is a fancy kind of sewing machine that finishes and trims the edges of the fabric as you sew. (Don’t think I’m not thinking of stalking Craigslist for one now that I’ve broken the shirt-making seal.)

I’d heard rumours, though, that it’s doable to sew knits on a regular sewing machine. In fact, I read quite a lot about this as I nurtured my fantasy of making my own clothes while not actually making any clothes.

And I’ll tell ya, the rumours are true! Sure, using a serger would probably make the process faster and less tedious, but it’s not a required tool. And since even entry-level sergers can set you back more than a couple hundred bucks, I hereby encourage you to give it a shot using your regular machine.

Here’s the skinny of what I learned during my weekend knits-sewing intensive:

What I Learned Sewing Knits for the First Time Using My Regular Sewing Machine

 

  1. That cutting fabric around paper pattern pieces using a rotary cutter isn’t as terrifying as it looks when you’ve never done it before. Awkward? Certainly. But also efficient and satisfying. The very first shirt I made was the Wanderlust Tee by Fancy Tiger Crafts, and I followed their Creativebug class as I went. (The class gave me courage, but it wasn’t exactly filled with help. I still had to look up some things.)
  2. A walking foot is essential. I learned how to use a walking foot when I made a quilt a couple of years ago, and I’d read they’re very helpful when sewing with knits, because knits have a tendency to stretch and distort when moving through a standard sewing machine. A walking foot has feed dogs that walk on top of the fabric, coordinated with the feed dogs that walk below the fabric, so the fabric is fed through the machine evenly at top and bottom. It’s well worth the $30 or so for a walking foot – I had zero trouble with my fabric stretching while I sewed, because it was fed evenly through my machine. (These contraptions are a bit more complicated than other kinds of presser feet, so I recommend looking for a tutorial specific to your sewing machine to see how to install it. It’s not hard to do, but it’s not necessarily clear how to do it without instructions.)
  3. How to thread a twin needle (it’s not nearly as complicated as you might think!). A twin needle is exactly what it sounds like: two needles attached at a shaft so they fit into your machine just like a single needle does. And what they do is like magic! Each needle is threaded from its own spool, and when you sew, they create parallel lines of stitches on the right side, and a decorative configuration of stitches on the wrong side. If you position the needles on either side of the edge of a hem, they’ll tack down the edge on the wrong side. Even if you use a serger to sew knit pieces together, you’ll use a twin needle to finish the edges. The first few minutes of this YouTube video got me threading my twin needles lickety-split. (I still have no idea what she’s talking about re: putting one thread to the left of something-or-other and the other thread to the right. As far as I could tell, I can’t access whatever that thing is on my Elna machine, so I ignored that instruction. No big deal.)
  4. How to sew with a twin needle. It’s tricky, but totally doable. I mean, the sewing itself is not tricky; it’s exactly the same as sewing with a single needle. What’s tricky is sewing a hem down with the right side of the fabric facing. Since you can’t actually see the edge of the hem, because it’s folded to the wrong side, this is an exercise in sewing by feel and having faith you measured properly. I know I rarely measure properly, so I had to focus hard on feeling for the hem edge. I bought both a 2mm and 4mm twin needle when I was preparing to sew with knits, not having any idea what the measurement was of. Turns out, that’s the measurement of the distance between the needles – so go for the biggest number you can find! I found 4mm a challenge, for sure, but I managed it. I sewed slowly and used my index fingers to keep track of the edge of the hem by feel. I was about 95% accurate, and I fudged the 5% where I missed the edge.
  5. To use awesome fabric. This is a lesson I’ve learned over time with yarn – I used to be tempted to save my most gorgeous yarn for something special, and what ended up happening was that I’d never use it. How dumb! I always encourage beginner crocheters to choose yarn they love, even though what they’ll make with it will probably be a total disaster. Making total disasters is what beginners are supposed to do! Which makes those disasters absolutely perfect. And we should make them with materials we enjoy using. So for my shirts, I used fabric I’ve been hoarding for a while because I bought it on sale for someday-maybe. The first shirt I made this weekend (shown in the photo above) is far more cropped than anything I’d normally wear. But I only had one yard of that fabric, and I love that fabric, and it was exactly the right amount to make a cropped shirt. So I went for it. I knew I might mess it up and ruin the fabric I love so much, but I decided I would rather mess up with fabric I was excited about than end up with a perfect shirt I wouldn’t actually want to wear. So a cropped shirt I made. And I love it. My hems aren’t sewn straight (I never sew straight, so whatever), and the bottom is a little too wide, but I just love it. I wore it immediately, layered over a long tank top. Which is how I’ve become someone who wears a cropped shirt.

Further Notes

  • I made one Wanderlust Tee and almost three One Hour Tops. Had I realized how much simpler the One Hour Top is than the Tee, I would have started with it! But I’m glad I had the experience of sewing set-in sleeves. I wasn’t sure I was doing it right, but I did do it right! Still, the One Hour Tee is more my style, and I’m determined to make enough of them that I become able to actually make one in only an hour.
  • The neck band on the Wanderlust Tee utterly defeated me. I was completely unable to make it work. So I ditched it and just folded the neckline 1/2″ to the wrong side and finished it that way (same as the cuffs and hemline).
  • Always use a zig-zag stitch for sewing knit fabrics – it’ll allow the seams to stretch along with the fabric (and a straight stitch won’t).
  • Finishing the edges (sleeve cuffs, hemline, neckline) was the part I enjoyed least. Not because of the twin needle (which produces a stretchy stitch – don’t sew a zig-zag with a twin needle!). It was that pressing knits is a pain, especially with lighter-weight fabric. The crease you make isn’t nearly as distinct or persistent as it is when you use woven fabrics, and I found myself winging it more than I would have liked.
  • But who cares. Wing it!

Pattern Recommendations

When I posted a photo of my first tee over on Instagram, I asked which t-shirt patterns people love. Here are the recommendations commenters made:

 

Note: Some links in this post are affiliate links.

Free Pattern: Simplest Crochet Hat!

Free pattern for the simplest crochet hat! http://kimwerker.com/blog

My friend recently pulled a hat out of his coat pocket and said, "Kim! I hope you can help me. This is my favourite hat, and I want a few more of them. What's it made out of? Where can I buy more?"

It was the simplest crocheted hat ever. Beanie length, double crochet with a single crochet brim in a contrasting colour. By my best guess it was made from soft acrylic yarn. I was like, "Friend, you can probably find more of these at any craft fair in town, and probably at the farmer's market when the weather warms up. It's the simplest hat ever! You know what, I'll make you one."

So I went home and dug around for some yarn. I'm pretty sure his original hat was made in DK or sportweight yarn, but I found some of my favourite worsted weight, and whipped this up in an evening of Netflix.

Then before I gave it to him, I was like, I should write this pattern up. It's so simple!

And so I did.

Get the Free Pattern:

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FREE SIMPLEST BEANIE CROCHET PATTERN!

To crochet the hat, you'll need about 100 yards of worsted weight yarn, plus a small amount in a contrasting colour – about 10 or 12 yards. That and a 5mm (US H/8) hook, and you can whip one up in one sitting.

Don't know how to crochet but want to make awesome projects like this? Take my beginner crochet class at Craftsy, and I'll have you crocheting in no time!

Already crochet but want to seriously up your game? Take my class Crochet in the Round: Basics & Beyond and you'll learn how to size this hat so it'll fit a head of any size, from newborn to gigantic – and you'll learn so much more, too!

Free pattern for the simplest crochet hat! http://kimwerker.com/blog
Make the simplest crocheted hat! Get the free pattern at http://kimwerker.com/blog

A Cape in One Night!

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The other night, my friend Elin came over with her sewing machine and I learned that she had been taught to sew as a child – how to use paper patterns and everything. As she motored through a production line of baby- and child-sized pants (Oliver + S designs such freaking adorable pants!), I set to finally making Owen a cape. I’d had the web page of the tutorial open in my browser for like six weeks. It was time.

Little did I know as I neurotically paced my house looking for stash fabric and scissors and a pencil that I would end up staying up till midnight finishing the entire thing.

So, the O Cape! I followed this tutorial pretty much to the letter. I didn’t have magnetic snaps around (such a good idea, though), so I used velcro at the neck. Oh, and obviously I added the O appliqué before I sewed the front and back together. My tattoo came in handy as I freehanded the O.

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I found myself pretty clever when I loaded a contrasting thread into my bobbin for sweet top stitching on both the front and the back. (It’s the O Cape because, as Elin declared, O is for orange, owls and Owen).

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Naturally, the next morning Owen would have nothing to do with the cape.

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But then I put it on Marie Antoinette to take some photos, and when Owen came home and saw her wearing his cape, he wanted to put it on. Score.

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And now I want to sew more things that I could complete in one night. Got any favourite quick projects?